28-year-old target tells Manchester United he wants to become their joint 4th-highest-paid player

Ivan Toney wants his next contract to be worth £250k a week

According to Manchester Evening News, Brentford striker Ivan Toney is demanding a £250,000-per-week salary package as part of his imminent move this summer.

The 28-year-old has impressed ever since coming up to the Premier League with Brentford nearly three seasons ago.

Man United and Arsenal are the ones currently leading the race for Toney’s signature.

Toney's Premier League record: 81 appearances, 36 goals, 10 assists. (Source: Premier League) (Photo by Steve Bardens/Getty Images)
Toney’s Premier League record: 81 appearances, 36 goals, 10 assists. (Source: Premier League) (Photo by Steve Bardens/Getty Images)

Brentford can be expected to significantly lower their price for Toney given the England international enters the final year of his contract next season and has made it clear that he wishes to move on.

The price is likely to come down even further if the Bees are relegated to the Championship at the end of this season.

A price United can afford

If United were to match Toney’s reported wage demands, they’ll end up paying him more than their captain, Bruno Fernandes.

This looks staggering on paper, before you check the numbers and realise the likes of Anthony Martial and Mason Mount also make £250k a week at Old Trafford. (Source: Capology)

Casemiro, Raphaël Varane, and Marcus Rashford are United’s top three earners, each making more than £300k per week. (Photo by OLI SCARFF/AFP via Getty Images)

This is a good illustration of how poor United have been with their resource allocation when it comes to both player wages and transfer fees.

Of course, the matter can be tentatively sorted out by handing Fernandes a slightly improved contract, since his current one expires at the end of the 2025/26 season.

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While Toney is the kind of player United should actively consider giving a £250k-a-week contract to, they do need to carry out a bit of a surgery on their wage bill in an attempt to make it more sustainable.